• August 5, 2019
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Employee motivation is a constant challenge at work. Supervisors and managers go the hard way, especially in work environments that do not emphasize employee satisfaction as part of an accepted and supported overall business strategy.

On the one hand, they recognize their power in getting the best employees they have to offer, while on the other hand, they may not feel supported, rewarded, or recognized for their work to develop motivated, contributing employees.

Proposal for managers? Download it. No work environment will ever perfectly support your efforts to help employees choose motivated work behaviors. Even the most supportive jobs provide day-to-day challenges and often seem to work cross-purposes with your goals and efforts to encourage employee motivation.

No matter what climate your organization provides to support employee motivation, you can create an environment that encourages and encourages employee motivation.

Employees want to be members of the crowd, people who know what’s going on at work as soon as other employees know. They want the information they need to get things done. They need enough information to make good decisions about their work.

Meet employees after senior management meetings to update any company information that may affect their performance. Changing dates, customer feedback, product improvements, training opportunities, and updates to new department reports or interaction structures are important to employees. Communicate more than you think is necessary.
Stop working with employees who are particularly affected by change to communicate more. Make sure the employee is clear about what the change means for their job, goals, time allocation and decisions.

Communicate with every employee who reports to you daily. Even a pleasantly good morning allows the employee to engage with you.

Hold a weekly one-on-one meeting with each employee who reports. They want to know that they will have this time every week. Encourage employees to be prepared with questions, support requests, problem-solving ideas about their work, and information that will prevent you from being blinded or frustrated by failure to meet a schedule or as a commitment.